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Address:  South Texas Street, Hunter, Oklahoma 74640 County Garfield
Started 1937 Completed 1937

Current Usage

Description:

The Hunter Waterworks consists of five pumphouses arranged in an L-shaped pattern east of the city-owned lake. The buildings at the far extremities are constructed of red brick: the building farthest north measures 9′ x 8′ and the building on the southeast corner measures 13′ x 10′. The three other buildings, later additions, are constructed of poured concrete blocks and measure 61 x 61 except for the center building, which measures 7′ x 7′. Starting with building Ill in the southeast corner, the distances between buildings are 69 feet, 92 feet, 75 feet, and 71 feet. The structures have sloping flat roofs except for building 113, which has no roof and building 112, which is partially ruined. Building 115 has a wood frame window. Entrances consist of single wood doors. The pumphouses retain their architectural integrity and could easily be restored to their original condition.
The construction of the Hunter Waterworks during the Depression was important to this agricultural community as a means of temporary employment and as a moral booster. Besides providing an opportunity for work, the project brought a much-needed improvement to the city of Hunter: a dependable water system. The importance of a waterworks to western Oklahoma towns is revealed in city clerk Edna Lewis’ remark in 1938 that the new waterworks facility “has meant more to the town than any other project.” As a WPA project, the Hunter Waterworks is important as an example of water supply projects conducted throughout northwestern Oklahoma. Within the community, the pumphouses are unique in terms of type and style.[1]

VERBAL BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION: Lots 3, 6, and 20, Block 31; Lot 22, Block 37; Lot 5, Block 38; Hunter original.

Sources:

  1. Oklahoma Landmarks Inventory Nomination

Supported Documents:

  1. WPA Properties Garfield County – Hunter Waterworks

Photos: